Manually Override DNS -Window, Linux and Mac Examples


First off, let me explain what a DNS Entry is in order for us to understand why we would need to override it. Basically a DNS entry is a record or entry that tells us what ip address is of a domain will point to. Such as an example (not actual) IP of could point to a domain such as

Say perhaps we are updating a DNS entry and as the nature of DNS would have it, sometimes it will take up to 48 hours for the DNS to propagate through the Internet. Or perhaps we don’t want to update a DNS record which could affect everyone but rather just change a record for ourselves, locally. In these case, we can manually override the DNS change which will only reflect on our local machine. Below I will show you how to achieve this on Windows, Linux and Mac.

Manually Override DNS on Windows

Open up the hosts file located under “C:\Windows\System32\etc\drivers\“. In there you will see the IP address in the left column and a space separated list of domains to the right. The below example will set the 3 domains of, and to the IP address of

Manually Override DNS on Linux

vi the hosts file which is located under /etc/hosts. Add in a line below the last entry in the same fashion as you would for windows. For example if you wanted to change the ip address for the domain to point to you would enter:

Manually Override DNS DNS on Mac

Mac is the same as the above linux example. Simply edit the hosts file under /etc/hosts and add in the entries as needed. So again, you could enter something such as:

Manually Override DNS Using IPV6

You don’t always have to use a standard IPV4 as the IP address. You can also use IPV6 and enter it into any of the hosts files like so:

fe80::1%lo0 localhost

And that is all there is in Manually Override DNS in windows, linux and mac.